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DRAFT Green Tier Legacy Community Charter

DRAFT Green Tier Legacy Community Charter

Legacy Communities Green Tier CHARTER (10-07-10 draft)

This Charter is entered into by the WI Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and 1000 Friends of Wisconsin (1000 Friends), League of WI Municipalities (League), WI Energy Conservation Corp (WECC), Municipal Environmental Group (MEG), University of WI Center On WI Strategy COWS), and Individual municipalities that elect to participate in this Charter (initial municipalities are: Cities of Appleton, Fitchburg, Bayfield, Middleton).  All these organizations are collectively referred to as “Parties”.

Introduction

A. The League, 1000 Friends, MEG, WECC and COWS are statewide non-governmental organizations prepared to work with the DNR and municipalities to accomplish the goals of this Charter.

B. The Parties have established goals for this Charter.  Together, key issues were identified that the Parties will work together to address.  These key issues center on a wide range of sustainability practices available to municipalities, and municipal water resource management. Such a precedent lends support to the Green Tier Charter concept of better relations between state and local governments and other non-governmental organizations to achieve common goals that focus on achieving superior environmental performance.

I. Purpose

The purpose of this Charter is to establish an agreement pursuant to Wis. Stat. §§ 299.83(7e) and 66.0301 by which municipalities take actions and share information to achieve superior environmental performance with regard to one or both of the following areas: (1) water quality and water resources management; and/or (2) sustainability practices.

The term ‘sustainability’ means local governments addressing the needs of the present while not compromising the ability of future generations to address their needs.  It encompasses a broad framework of interrelated issues that includes environmental stewardship, economic growth, public health and social equity.  Sustainability practices could include reducing green house gas emissions, reducing municipal energy use, and developing, implementing a transportation system that reduces total vehicle miles traveled, increasing access to local foods, and supporting local business development. Policies in this Charter are intended to be consistent with and complimentary to a Signatory Municipality’s Comprehensive Plan.

Participating municipalities will select either water quality/water resources management or sustainability practices, or both, but are not required to pursue both tracks.

The Charter will achieve superior environmental performance in the following ways:

(1)  Municipalities subscribing to the water resources pilot component of this charter will achieve superior environmental performance by addressing wastewater, stormwater, drinking water, wetlands, and other water issues in a holistic, watershed based manner.  Municipalities subscribing to the water quality pilot component of this charter will prepare, evaluate and implement an overall Water Resources Plan that integrates the municipality’s full range of water resources issues. This may include some or all of the following elements:

¨      Wastewater management, including treatment plant compliance, collection system maintenance and long term sewer service area planning.

¨      Stormwater management including stormwater quality controls, stormwater quantity and floodplain management, and integration with DNR permitting.

¨      Integration of rural water management issues, including agricultural drainage ditch issues and agricultural nonpoint runoff into urban lands within the watershed.

¨      Navigable waters (Chapter 30, Wis Stats), wetlands, shoreland, floodplains management including associated habitat issues.

¨      Groundwater management issues including management of groundwater quality, groundwater quantity and regional recharge issues.

¨      Public water supply issues including drinking water quality and water conservation and compliance with Safe Drinking Water act provisions

¨      Water budget issues, including the overall evaluation of water quantity and quality entering and leaving the watershed considering ground and surface water issues.

(2)  Municipalities subscribing to the sustainability component of this Charter will initially focus on improving a municipality’s impact on the environment by using the strategy options listed in Appendix 3 to develop a Sustainability Implementation and Monitoring Plan.  Such an implementation plan may address:

¨      ’Build and Buy’ green strategies and programs.

¨      Strategies to promote environmental stewardship in the private sector.

¨      Transportation policies and actions that increase pedestrians, bicyclists, transit passengers as a primary mode of transportation, and that are designed to reduce public per-capita VMT and GHG emissions.

¨      Land use policies and actions that seek to identify, cleanup and redevelop brownfield sites, promote street connectivity and mixed-use development, and protect natural resources.

¨      Environmental stewardship, energy efficiency, waste and materials management policies and the use of renewable fuels to reduce total energy consumption throughout the community.

¨      Local government practices that encourage municipal employees to conserve energy, preserve the environment, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from municipal facilities, services, and vehicle fleets.

¨      Encourage residents and businesses to adopt sustainable practices.

(3)  All municipalities subscribing to this charter will share information, resources, technology, and environmental success stories with one another on a regular basis.

II. Background

1.           Wisconsin’s Green Tier Program, established by Wis. Stat. § 299.83, authorizes the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to issue an environmental results charter to an association of public or private entities to assist those entities in achieving superior environmental performance and to assist those entities in participating in Tier 1 or Tier 2 of the Green Tier Program.

2.         In 2007, Governor Jim Doyle created the Global Warming Task Force (GWTF) in part to develop policy recommendations and identify goals for GHG reductions and to minimize the economic, environmental, and public health impacts of global warming.  In July 2008, the GWTF issued its Final Report, entitled Wisconsin’s Strategy for Reducing Global Warming.  Recognizing that direct and indirect sources of GHG emissions fall under the jurisdiction or control of local units of government, the GWTF Report includes numerous strategies that either directly apply to, or are inherently reliant upon, local units of government in Wisconsin.

3.         Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning Law, Wis. Stat. § 66.1001, requires most political subdivisions in Wisconsin to develop a Comprehensive Plan by January 1, 2010, in order to promote harmonious and coordinated development, meet future needs, and provide for the general welfare.  To assist communities with comprehensive planning, the Wisconsin Department of Administration operates a Comprehensive Planning Grant Program.

4.         The Wisconsin Office of Energy Independence (OEI) was established in April 2007 in part to advance the goal of producing 25 percent of Wisconsin’s power and 25 percent of Wisconsin’s transportation fuels from renewable sources by 2025.  OEI serves as the state government point of contact for businesses and local units of government pursuing energy efficiency and the development of renewable energy.  OEI also identifies, and facilitates applications for, federal, state, and private sources of funding for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.

5.         The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), pursuant to its authorities under the federal Clean Air Act, has initiated (or is expected to soon initiate) steps to regulate the emission of greenhouse gasses from mobile sources and major stationary sources.  Steps taken by USEPA include issuance of a final rule requiring the mandatory reporting of GHG emissions by certain source categories (74 FR 56260; October 30, 2009) and issuance of findings that GHG emissions endanger the public health and welfare, and that emissions of GHGs from mobile sources contribute to this endangerment (74 FR 66496; December 15, 2009).

6.         Many communities in Wisconsin have embraced local sustainability initiatives, such as The Natural Step Framework, as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reduce a community’s overall environmental impact.

7.         In light of these varied but overlapping programs aimed at curbing energy use and GHG emissions and reducing environmental impact at the community level, a mechanism is needed to facilitate action by local units of government in a manner that realizes the economic benefits of such reductions and provides municipalities with recognition for their efforts.

8.         Addressing water issues on a holistic basis will result in more efficient use of both local and state staff and resources, decrease municipal costs, and improve water quality within the watershed. Existing water programs administered by DNR that directly impact municipalities include but are not limited to:

§  Chapter 30, Wis Stats and NR 300, WI Adm. Code series — Activities in and near navigable waters

§  NR 216 and NR 151, WI Adm Code — Municipal Stormwater

§  Chapter 283 Wis Stat. – Wastewater Discharge Permits

§  Chapters 280 & 281 Wis Stats.

§  NR 103 WI Adm Code – Wetlands analysis

§  NR 115 WI Adm Code —  Shoreland zoning

§  NR 116 WI Adm Code –Floodplain zoning

§  NR 117 WI Adm Code – Shoreland Wetland Zoning

§  NR 809 and NR 811 WI Adm Code – Safe Drinking Water

III. Goals of the Charter

The Goals of this Charter are:

1.         To assist municipalities in achieving superior environmental performance in one or both of the following two areas: (1) water quality & water resources management; (2) sustainability practices;  and goals relating to economic development, public health and social equity; and to recognize their efforts and progress.

2.         To improve the quality of life and economic vitality of communities.

3.         To help municipalities and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources address wastewater, stormwater, drinking water, wetlands, and other water issues in a holistic, watershed-based manner.

4.         To assist municipalities in preparing, implementing, and improving an overall watershed plan(s) that integrates the municipality’s full range of water resources issues.

5.         To assist municipalities in preparing, implementing and improving over time a sustainability plan that reduces a municipality’s impact on the environment.

6.         To facilitate access to state and federal funding for projects and activities related to achieving the purposes of this charter, such as energy efficiency, renewable energy, GHG reductions, comprehensive planning, transportation policies, and integrated planning for wastewater treatment, storm water treatment and management; and drinking water.

7          To realize taxpayer savings through reduced municipal expenditures on motor vehicle fuels and energy resulting from efficient development patterns

8.         To help municipalities comply with various water regulations in a more efficient, cost effective and flexible manner.

9.         To achieve other demonstrable and measurable environmental improvements beyond what is required by local, state, or federal law.

IV. Charter Signatories

The Signatories to the Charter will include:

1.         The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

2.         1000 Friends of Wisconsin (1000 Friends)

3.         League of Wisconsin Municipalities (League)

4.         Municipal Environmental Group Wastewater  Division (MEG)

5.         Individual municipalities that elect to participate in this Charter

6.          University of WI – Center On WI Strategy   (COWS)

7.           WI Energy Conservation Corp (WECC)

V. Timeframe of Charter

1. Effective Date.  This Charter will become effective when signed by DNR, 1000 Friends, the League, MEG-Wastewater, COWS, and the first municipality to subscribe to the Charter.  New signatories may be added to the charter pursuant to the process outlined in Appendix I.

2. Duration of Charter.  This Charter will remain in effect for five (5) years from the effective date unless terminated as described below:

(A)       The Charter may be extended for additional five (5) year terms with the written approval of the DNR, and a majority of the signatories of this Charter.

(B)       The Charter may be terminated as a whole either by the DNR, or by a majority of the signatories of this Charter after 90 days of written notice of termination.

(C)       The water resources component of the Charter may be terminated by the DNR at the conclusion of the 3 year pilot program as set forth in Appendix 2.

(D)       Any individual signatory may withdraw themselves from the Charter after 90 days of written notice to each of the members of the Legacy Communities Steering Committee.

VI. Responsibilities of Signatories

1. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources agrees to:

(A)       Convene an ad hoc “Resource Team” of agency experts to serve as a resource for Charter Signatories.  Members of the DNR programs represented on the Resource Team shall assist signatory municipalities as per Wis. Stats.§299.83 (4m)(e).

(B)       Explore and facilitate access to state and federal funding, and the means to prioritize applications for DNR funding on behalf of Charter Signatories to further the goals of this Charter.

(C)       Provide access to senior DNR officials so that barriers to sustainable practices may be identified and removed.

(D)       Facilitate interagency cooperation.

(F)       Provide recognition no less than annually of the participation of Signatory Municipalities and their accomplishments.

(G)       Undertake the additional responsibilities as specified in Appendices to this Charter.

2.  Other Organizational Signatories (1000 Friends, League, WECC, MEG-Wastewater, and COWS) agree to:

(A)             Promote and solicit signatories to the Charter (All).

(B)              Organize and convene regular meetings and conference calls of the Charter signatories (1000 Friends as lead, with assistance from League and MEG).

(C)              Annually assess the impact and effectiveness of the Charter and report annually to the department on the activities that have been engaged in under the Charter.  This annual report shall be submitted to the DNR by March 31st for the preceding year. (1000 Friends as lead, with assistance from COWS).

(D)       Assist with establishing Charter member communication between members and the DNR (All).

(E)       Assist in exploring and alerting municipalities to funding opportunities available to communities for implementing Charter activities (1000 Friends as lead with assistance from League).

(F)       Assist in drafting future appendices and policies (League as lead, with input from (All).

(G)       Provide technical assistance to the Charter municipalities to achieve their goals under this Charter. (All)

3.  Municipality signatories agree to:

(A)             Implement the purposes of this Charter by developing a Sustainability Implementation and Monitoring Plan and/or a Water Resources Plan as set forth in Appendix 2, that specify the goals, policies, and actions the municipality has set for the Charter.

(B)              Engage the public and other affected stakeholders in implementing the goals and measuring the progress of their Charter commitments, including but not limited to a web site available to the public that specifies the goals that the municipality has set for the Charter, and its policies and action that demonstrate the progress made in meeting those goals.

(C)              Identify and act upon local environmental priorities consistent with this Charter, while striving in good faith to achieve each of the Charter’s goals.

(D)             Share information, technologies, and strategies used to advance the Charter’s goals with the other signatories to the Charter.

(F)       Annually report to the Organizational Signatories the progress made in achieving the goals to improve the municipality’s overall Sustainability Implementation and Monitoring Plan and /or Water Resources Plan (see A. above).

VII. Governance Provisions

Implementation of this Charter will be coordinated and overseen by a Legacy Communities Green Tier Steering Committee. Membership of the steering committee shall consist of one person from each of the following organizations: 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, League of Wisconsin Municipalities, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Municipal Environmental Group – Wastewater; and University of WI Center On WI Strategy, and up to four representatives of the signatory municipalities.

VIII. General Provisions

A. APPLICABLE LAW AND EFFECT OF CHARTER.

Wisconsin law governs this Charter. Nothing in this Charter is intended to be contradictory to or inconsistent with applicable Federal, State and Local laws, ordinances, regulations, or environmental standards in effect during the period of this Charter. This Charter does not bind the State Legislature and their actions affecting the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

B. SEVERABILITY.

All covenants, terms and conditions contained herein are severable, and in the event any competent court or agency shall hold any of them invalid, this Charter shall be interpreted as if such invalid covenants, terms or conditions were not contained herein. However, each Signatory shall have the right to terminate its participation in this Charter following the severing of any portion of this Charter.

C. AMENDMENT.

This Charter may be amended only in writing by agreement of the Legacy Communities Green Tier Steering Committee and the DNR. Any amendment shall be consistent with and in furtherance of the objectives, terms, and conditions of this Charter. If an Amendment will increase the number or scope of provisions in this Charter, or materially alter the level and type of environmental performance, then the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources shall provide an additional public notice and may provide an additional public information meeting as required by law.

D. REMOVAL OF SIGNATORY.

If any signatory fails to fulfill their obligations under this Charter in a timely or proper manner, or violates any of its provisions, the violating party may be removed from the Charter by agreement of both the DNR and the Legacy Communities Green Tier Steering Committee. The violating signatory must be given thirty (30) days written notice of removal, specifying the alleged violations, and the effective date of the removal of the violating party. If the violating party cures their violation within the thirty (30) days they shall not be removed from the Charter.

E. RESIGNATION OF CHARTER MEMBER(S).

Any municipal signatory to this Charter may resign from the Charter upon written notice to all other signatories.

F. TECHNICAL CONTACT.

Each signatory to this Charter shall provide, in writing to every other signatory, the name and contact information for an individual who will serve as the contact for purposes of this Charter. The contact shall serve as the primary contact person for all negotiations, agreements, and conflicts that may arise under this Charter and the signatories agree to communicate and work through these contacts to the fullest extent practicable. If the contact changes for a signatory, that signatory will notify all other signatories of the change and identify the new contact as soon as possible, preferably within 5 business days.

G. DISPUTE RESOLUTION.

The Legacy Communities Green Tier Steering Committee and the DNR will function as arbitrators for dispute resolution among the technical staff of all signatories.

IX. Warranty of Authority

Each of the persons signing below represents and warrants that they have the authority to execute this Charter on behalf of the party for which they sign.

X. Signatures

The authorizing signatures for each Signatory to the Charter follow:

1000 FRIENDS OF WISCONSIN

By/s/________________________

Steve Hiniker

LEAGUE OF WI MUNICIPALITIES

By/s/________________________

Dan Thompson

MUNICIPAL ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP WASTEWATER DIVISION

By/s/________________________

Wally Thom, President

CENTER ON WISCONSIN STRATEGIES

By/s/________________________

Joel Rodgers

WI ENERGY CONSERVATION CORPORATION

B/s/_________________________

Mary Schlaefer, Executive Director

STATE OF WISCONSIN

DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

By/s/ ______________________

Matthew J. Frank, Secretary

CITY OF MIDDLETON

By/s/________________________

Kurt Sonnentag, Mayor

CITY OF BAYFIELD

B/y/s/________________________

Larry MacDonald, Mayor

CITY OF FITCHBURG

B/s/________________________

Jay Allen, Mayor

CITY OF APPLETON

B/s/________________________

Tim Hanna, Mayor
APPENDIX I – NEW SIGNATORIES TO THE CHARTER

It is the intention that this Charter be structured to allow for expansion of new signatories consistent with the Environmental Results Program under s. 299.83, Stats.; except that the water resources component shall be  a pilot program limited to no more than 2 or 3 of the original signatories and for a period of three years unless extended following pilot review.

1.         Review Prior to Adding New Signatories

At the end of two years, the Steering Committee will meet with DNR Resources Team to evaluate the water resources and sustainability components of this Charter.

In addition, the review of the water resources component shall include review by the Water Division Administrator and Bureau Directors within the Division in accordance with the pilot evaluation criteria in Appendix 2, and they shall make a recommendation to the Secretary on whether the pilot should be expanded,  modified, or discontinued.  The Secretary shall determine whether new Participants can be added to the water resources component of the charter or whether the charter should be modified prior to the addition of new Participants.

2.         Procedure for Adding New Signatories.

All potential new Participants will complete a Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources approved application prior to requesting to become a Signatory to the Charter. A new Charter signatory will indicate at the time of application which of the available tracts they will pursue. New Signatories will be considered as follows:

A. A party wishing to become a signatory will submit a completed application requesting consideration to the DNR and the Legacy Communities Green Tier Steering Committee. The application will commit the party to meeting the requirements of the Charter and applicable appendices and will provide the following:

1) a schedule for implementing its program so as to catch-up with the work schedules of the original signatories,

2) a commitment to assign the resources necessary to participate in the Charter, and

3) the identity of a technical point of contact and a contact person intended to serve as the new signatory’s representative.

B. The DNR, and the Legacy Communities Green Tier Steering Committee will entertain new applicants to the Charter during the 1st quarter of each calendar year beginning two years after the signing of the Charter, for the duration of the Charter.

C. In reviewing the request, the DNR and the Legacy Communities Green Tier Steering Committee will evaluate the party’s ability to meet the requirements of the Charter. Subject to the provisions of paragraph 1, the DNR and the Legacy Communities Green Tier Steering Committee may add additional requirements to a potential new signatory as it deems appropriate.

APPENDIX 2 – WATER RESOURCES PILOT PROGRAM COMPONENT

The purpose of the Water Resources Pilot Program of the Legacy Community is to evaluate ways in which municipalities can achieve superior environmental performance by addressing water issues in a holistic manner and in a collaborative relationship with the Department of Natural Resources. The proposal set forth below is a pilot for a possible statewide program that will be subject to evaluation as set forth in Appendix 1, before expanded.

I.          Obligations of Municipal Participants

The goal of the Water Policy Resources Program is to reward and incentivize municipalities to look at water resource issues in their community on a holistic basis through comprehensive water planning and cooperative arrangements with the DNR.

A.        Water Resources Plan

(1)        To be eligible to participate in the Water Resources Component of the Legacy Community Charter, a municipality must agree to prepare a plan addressing water resources in its community in conformity with this section.

(2)        Water resources within the Municipality. The water resources plan should integrate the municipality’s full range of water resource issues. The plan shall identify community goals and priorities for improving water resources within the municipality. The following components must be addressed, and if not applicable, a brief explanation why it’s not applicable:

¨      Wastewater management, including treatment plant compliance, collection system maintenance and long term sewer service area planning.

¨      Stormwater management including stormwater quality controls, stormwater quantity and floodplain management, and integration with DNR permitting.

¨      Integration of rural water management issues, including agricultural drainage ditch issues and agricultural nonpoint runoff into urban lands within the watershed.

¨      Navigable waters (chapter 30), wetlands, shoreland and floodplains management including associated habitat issues.

¨      Groundwater management issues including management of groundwater quality, groundwater quantity and regional recharge issues.

¨      Public water supply issues including drinking water quality, water conservation and compliance with Safe Drinking Water act provisions

¨      Water budget issues, including the overall evaluation of water quantity and quality entering and leaving the watershed considering ground and surface water issues.

(3)        Water Resources outside the Municipality.  In evaluating the water resource issues within the community as set forth above, the municipality shall also identify areas in which water resource issues within its watershed involve water resource issues outside of its boundaries, and potential opportunities for inter-governmental approaches to address such issues.

(4)        Plan Preparation.  In developing a plan, municipalities should utilize existing water related planning documents and consult with the DNR and any County or regional planning agencies to ensure that existing relevant land and water resource plans have been identified and integrated into the municipal water plan.  Such plans may include DNR Basin Plans, County Land and Water Conservation Plans, and plans of adjacent municipalities. In addition, the municipality shall consult with DNR to determine whether any additional areas require development.

(5)        Priorities Beyond Compliance.  The plan shall identify those items which must be addressed to achieve compliance with permits or regulatory requirements.  In addition the Plan shall identify projects and establish  a set of priorities for addressing other water resource issues within the community  that are not otherwise required by DNR.

(6)        Plan Review.  Upon completion of the plan the municipality shall meet with the DNR to review whether the plan adequately addresses the components set forth above.

B.        Waterstar Review

Concurrently with the development of the Water Resources Plan the municipality shall evaluate its existing programs through the use of the Waterstar evaluation available at  https://www.waterstarwisconsin.org.  A municipality shall achieve at least a “bronze” status to be eligible to participate in the Legacy Community Charter.

C.        Program Integration and Coordination with DNR

(1)        Recognizing the regulatory functions municipalities serve, the municipality shall meet with DNR to determine whether there are opportunities for integration of municipal and state water programs or staff.  Such opportunities could include:  municipal assistance on education, permitting, inspection and enforcement; integration of education materials and permit applications; or certification of municipal staff with respect to certain water review functions.  Implementation of any such opportunities shall be with mutual consent and subject to separate cooperative agreements.

(2)        The municipality shall participate in a review with DNR at a schedule to be determined by the parties but at least 2 times per year during the pilot to: (a) identify significant water related projects within the municipality (either by the municipality or third parties if known); (b) review any permitting or compliance issues; (c) review the status of any cooperative agreements; and (d) identify any areas requiring additional planning or program integration.  If more than one municipality in a DNR region is participating, then such meetings can, at the option of the DNR, be held concurrently.

(3)        The municipality and the DNR shall develop a stakeholder group of organizations interested in water resource issues in the municipality such as the County, environmental advocacy groups and other interested parties and include such groups in the review meetings under Section I. C. (2).

II.        Obligations of DNR

A.        Single Point of Contact.

The Department shall designate a person to serve as a single point of contact along with a backup person.  The single point of contact shall have experience in two or more water programs and serve in a supervisory capacity.  Such a person can be from the region or central office at the option of the Department.  During the pilot period, the Department’s representative will be the Regional Water Leader.

B.        Assistance and Coordination with the Municipality.

(1)        The Department shall review and comment on the municipal Water Resources Plan as set forth in para I.A.

(2)        The Department shall meet with the municipality for purposes of identifying areas of program integration of municipal and state water programs or staff as set forth in para I.C.

C.        Regulatory Coordination and Flexibility for Municipal Projects

When the municipality is proposing a project that requires one or more water permits from the DNR, the DNR’s Single Point of Contact shall undertake the following:

(1)        To the extent practical, coordinate the permits within the DNR so that all such water permits are reviewed concurrently on an integrated timetable;

(2)        Supervise the review of the permits to ensure that the project and its impacts are reviewed in the context of the existing statutory standards, the impacts to the watershed as a whole, the goals of the municipal project and the municipality’s Water Resources Plan;

(3)        Foster a “problem solving” approach with respect to permitting or enforcement issues that recognizes both the municipality’s record under this Charter, and the Department’s flexibility in existing permitting standards and the Department’s enforcement discretion;

(4)        Facilitate resolution of disputes between DNR staff or between DNR staff and the municipality.

III.       Pilot Evaluation

A.        At the conclusion of 30 months from the date of this Charter, each municipality     shall prepare a summary of its work under this Charter that shall:

(1)        Describe the status of its Water Resources Plan under I.A

(2)        Indentify any areas of program integration with DNR under I. C., and describe any such programs.

(3)        Identify any water resources projects under taken pursuant to the Water     Resources Plan not otherwise required by DNR.

(4)         Describe any water resources permits obtained by the municipality and indentify whether and to what extent the Charter impacted the permitting process including a consideration of the following:

  • The permit review process included consideration of the Water Resources Plan and watershed based impacts
  • If the project involved multiple water permits, the permit processing and permit comment and hearings were coordinated.
  • Permit issues were resolved with the assistance of the single point of contact.

B.        Evaluation Options for Additional Points on Grant Applications

The DNR and the municipality shall evaluate whether participation in this Charter warrants consideration in competitive water resources grants administered by the Department and report back to the Green Tier Steering Committee with recommendations regarding such grants.